Monday, January 2, 2017

Actividad "rompe-hielo" para el regreso a la escuela


¡Feliz Año Nuevo! ¡El tiempo pasa muy rápido! En estos momentos muchos profesores han regresado a la escuela y el año escolar ha arrancado de nuevo.

Aquí les propongo una actividad rompe-hielo para el primer día de regreso a la escuela después de este período corto de vacaciones. Esta actividad invitará a sus estudiantes a moverse un poco por salón de clases y hacer uso del español. Para ponerle un poco más de ánimo a la actividad, les recomiendo hacer una competencia.

La actividad es simple, consiste en que los estudiantes se entrevisten y conversen sobre las actividades realizadas durante las vacaciones. En las hojas de actividades he recomendado un período de cinco minutos para recoger las firmas, pero obviamente esta actividad se puede adaptar a las necesidades de la clase. He incluido una página con instrucciones en español y otra página con instrucciones en inglés. De esta manera he dado la opción para elegir la que se adapte más a su metodología de enseñanza.

¡Feliz regreso a la escuela!
Carolina


Wednesday, December 21, 2016

El Año Viejo: A Latino American End of Year Tradition


El Año Viejo is a common year-end tradition in Colombia and other countries in Latin America. On December 31st, everyone gets excited about the New Year and its obligatory resolutions for change. Años Viejos are used in many places to symbolically leave behind bad things from the previous year. Traditionally, this involved burning effigies full of firecrackers or pockets of gunpowder, but for safety reasons, the practice has evolved into something less spectacular but no less important. Below you can find a video of how intense and exciting this celebration can be.





The Año Viejo is now crafted as a small doll in a tin. People take small pieces of paper and write all the bad things that have happened during the year. They then burn them and the doll in the tin as a symbol of renewal.

Some towns in Colombia and Ecuador host daylight parades on December 31st to show the effort and artistic talent that has been put into making the doll before it gets burned in the middle of the night.

There is a song about not forgetting the "Año Viejo" and being grateful for the great things in life. This song was composed by Cresencio Salcedo, a Colombian songwriter and made famous by Mexican singer Tony Camargo. The song is played all over Latin America during the December celebrations and and has been danced to for over 60 years! Below is a video of the original singer who never got to meet the writer of the song.

Yo no olvido al año viejo
Porque me ha dejado cosas muy buenas:
Me dejó una chiva,
Una burra negra,
Una yegua blanca
Y una buena suegra.


This is one of those traditions you can easily share with your students. Have them decorate their Año Viejo and have them think about what they would like to do in the future. I have a simple and fun activity where students put together their own paper "Año Viejo" and write about their goals for the new year. This resource is available on Teachers Pay Teachers.





¡Feliz Año!
Carolina

Thursday, November 24, 2016

La Noche de las Velitas (Part 2)


La Noche de las Velitas is one of the most exciting celebrations in Colombia since it marks the beginning of the Christmas season.  What a great opportunity to share this with your students and make it part of your class! I have written some blog posts in the past that provide more background and introduce you to some activities you may use to bring this celebration into your classroom.


Last, but not least, I just added a PowerPoint that's ready for you to use anytime! Click on the picture below to download it.

¡Feliz Noche de las Velitas!








Sunday, November 20, 2016

Christmas Songs in Spanish


Yes! I can't believe! It's that time of the year again! Smells like Christmas, one of my favorite times in the year. I am excited about all the new videos that came out on YouTube, and the best parts is that many of then include the lyrics which makes it perfect for a sing along. Some of the songs could be a little bit fast, so I recommend that you change the speed of the video on YouTube. You have to make sure you open the video on YouTube, once you are there, click on the settings icon, then click on speed and change from "normal" to "0.5". You are now with a perfect speed and the song still sounds great!  

Here are some of my favorite songs! If you have one that you would like me to add to the list, please share it with me in the comments. 




Mi Burrito Sabanero



Campana Sobre Campana



Polo Norte, Navidad y Rudolph el Venadito


Cascabel


Los Peces en el Río


Tutaina


Arre Burriquito y la Marimorena


Happy singing!
Carolina

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Thanksgiving Songs in Spanish


Here is a collection of four fun songs that can be used with different ages at the elementary level.



El Día de Acción de Gracias by Music with Sara



Al Pavo Pavito 



Yo soy un pavo




Hola Señor Pavo



Here is a short video which is perfect for "Movie Talk."

¡Feliz Día de Acción de Gracias!
Carolina

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Day of The Dead Songs and Videos for Elementary Students





It's always great to have all these videos in one place! Hopefully this will save you some time. I recommend you take the time to watch the videos before presenting them to your students to make sure they are appropriate not only for their developmental age and level of Spanish, but also to ensure they fit your school culture. Watching the video will also give you time to think of important questions of points you would like to discuss with your students. 

Videos to introduce  or talk about this celebration in class



 
Global Wonder Series - I stop the video after second 35, you will see why!




El Día de los Muertos vs Halloween
Click here to find version in Spanish









Songs


La Calaverita de Azúcar


Huesitos


Las Calaveras

Have fun sharing with your students about this important celebration!
Carolina

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Five Halloween Songs for Elementary Spanish


Halloween is an exciting time in elementary school. There is always so much vocabulary that could be explored around it: colors, shapes, likes, costumes and so on. You don't have to go anywhere else to find great songs for your class. Below I am sharing five of my favorite ones!


Los Monstruos



¡Es Halloween!



Chumbala Cachumba



Tumbas, Tumbas



Cinco Calabazas


Happy Halloween! ¡Feliz Día de las Brujas!
Carolina


Monday, October 17, 2016

Day of the Dead Celebration in Sumpango, Guatemala

                                                                                            Foto: Multiturismo Moca

El Día de los Muertos, also known as El Día de los Difuntos or Todos Santos in other places in Latin America is celebrated in different ways all throughout the continent. In Guatemala, the Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 1st. People around the country gather in cemeteries to celebrate and remember their loved ones who are not here anymore.
One of the most unique celebrations takes place in the Sumpango, Sacatepéquez where a giant kite festival is held. It's believed that the kites will fly to communicate with the spirits of their loved ones. Preparations for this celebration start months before the celebration. Take a look at these two clips to learn about this beautiful tradition!




Have your students decorate barriletes to celebrate El Día de los Muertos in your class. Download the printables here.


Have fun!
Carolina


Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Activities and Resources for the First Days of School

I partnered with Mundo de Pepita to share resources and activities for the new school. It was a week filled with a lot of excitement and free resources for you all! Make sure to click on every picture and read all the different activities. 












Have a wonderful school year!
Carolina


Wednesday, July 27, 2016

The CI and TPRS Challenge

iFLT (The International Forum on Language Teaching) was a mind changing conference for me. I have always been interested in the use of CI (Comprehensible Input) and TPRS in Spanish class. I had actually never attended a formal training on this topic before. I had even heard from other teachers that going to iFTL was a waste of money and time and that it was best to look for free videos and train myself that way. In fact, that's what I have been doing all this time, but after attending iFLT I realized that I still had a long way to go and was far from perfection. 

At the conference, I got to see the use of CI and TPRS firsthand in a live demo in an elementary classroom and even sneak a photo op with Dr. Stephen Krashen during "selfie time."
Since I am a visual learner, it was best for me to spend time in the language labs. I visited Annabelle Allen  and spent a lot of time watching Jason Fritze in action. After seeing both of them in action, I felt inspired and got so many ideas to put into practice in the new school year. 
Jason Fritze in action during iFLT 2016

I used the word "challenge" in the title of this post because being able to use TPRS and CI in the classroom is not that an easy task. It requires a lot of planning, willingness to fail, humor, patience, stand up comedy skills and a lot of physical activity. Nothing that a teacher with passion lacks, but something that still requires repetition and practice to get closer to perfection.

My question for your now is: Are you willing to join the CI and TPRS challenge? If your answer is yes and you are feeling ready to start the journey,  then I recommend that you visit the links below:

How to Implement TPRS in an elementary classroom?
Comprensible Input is the Key
Five Ways to Incorporate Comprehensible Input
CI & TPRS in Action

Enjoy your journey!
Carolina


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